Rural #Poverty approaches, Policies & Strategies in #Eritrea

Rural Poverty Portal

“Because at least one third of Eritrean households are headed by women, gender equality constitutes a key element of the country’s poverty reduction strategy. Households headed by women are generally the poorest and most vulnerable to food insecurity.”

Economic growth and food security have been the central objectives of the Government of Eritrea since independence in 1993. According to the country’s interim Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper of 2004, its overall development strategy focuses on sustainable growth and the reduction of poverty, with the involvement of the private sector.

Key elements of the strategy are to:

  • develop export markets for livestock, fruit, vegetables and flowers
  • re-establish port activities
  • increase agricultural productivity by strengthening public services to small-scale farmers, and promote development of a supporting private sector
  • attract investment from the private sector
  • privatize state-owned enterprises
  • develop a sound financial system

Decentralization is also a high priority on the government’s development agenda. It is expected to help reduce poverty by improving access to services.

Because at least one third of Eritrean households are headed by women, gender equality constitutes a key element of the country’s poverty reduction strategy. Households headed by women are generally the poorest and most vulnerable to food insecurity. The National Union of Eritrean Women, with some 200,000 members throughout the country, is a major agency for implementation of rural projects.

Programmes to eradicate rural poverty benefit from a strong sense of community. Wealthier households traditionally dispose of assets, mainly livestock, to make loans to poorer relatives and neighbours during particularly hard times. Rural people also commonly practice labour-sharing, assisting households that for some reason are unable to cultivate their land as the agricultural cycle requires.

Source: IFAD

Categories: Cultural, Economy, General | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

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